What is Asacol?

Category: Prescription Drugs

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Generic name: Mesalamine

This is an anti-inflammatory agent used to treat ulcerative colitis (a condition in which part or all of the lining of the colon [large intestine] is swollen or worn away). Brand names include Asacol®; Canasa®; Lialda™; Pentasa®; Rowasa®.

Reported purpose & perceived effectiveness
Purpose Patients Evaluations Perceived Effectiveness
Ulcerative colitis 35 20
Crohn's disease 30 10
Microscopic colitis 4 2
Bowel irritability 2 1
Diarrhea 2 2

Show all 8 reasons taken


  • Major
  • Moderate
  • Slight
  • None
  • Can't tell

Side effects

Side effects as an overall problem

Side effects as an overall problem
Severity Evaluations
Severe 0
Moderate 2
Mild 4
None 27

Commonly reported side effects and conditions associated with Asacol

Side effect Patients
Constipation 1
Decreased kidney function 1
Elevated liver enzymes 1
Fever/chills 1
Hair loss 1
Heartburn 1

Show all 11 reported side effects

Dosages

Based on patients currently taking Asacol

Dosage Patients
2,400 mg daily 3
4,800 mg daily 2
1,200 mg daily 1
800 mg three times daily 1
3,200 mg daily 1

Why patients stopped taking Asacol

Multiple reasons could be selected

Reason Patients
Did not seem to work 15
Doctor's advice 8
Side effects too severe 5
Other 4
Change in health plan coverage 1
Course of treatment ended 1
See all 26 patients who've stopped taking Asacol

Duration

Currently taking Asacol

Duration Patients
1 - 2 years 1
2 - 5 years 1
5 - 10 years 4
10 years or more 3

Stopped taking Asacol

Duration Patients
Less than 1 month 5
1 - 6 months 8
6 months - 1 year 3
1 - 2 years 2
2 - 5 years 1
5 - 10 years 2
10 years or more 5
Adherence
Adherence Evaluations
Always 25
Usually 6
Sometimes 0
Never taken as prescribed 2
Burden
Burden Evaluations
Very hard to take 4
Somewhat hard to take 5
A little hard to take 5
Not at all hard to take 19
Cost per month
Cost per month Evaluations
$200+ 1
$100-199 3
$50-99 1
$25-49 3
< $25 8
Not specified 17

What people switch to and from

Patients started taking Asacol after stopping:

Treatment Patients
Balsalazide (Colazal) 1
Mercaptopurine (Purinethol) 1
Mesalamine (Pentasa) 1

Patients stopped taking Asacol and switched to:

Treatment Patients
Adalimumab (Humira) 1
Balsalazide (Colazal) 1
Naltrexone (Low Dose Naltrexone (LDN)) 1
Last updated:

2 patient evaluations for Asacol

May 31, 2014 (Started Oct 05, 2011)

  • Effectiveness
    Major (for Crohn's disease)
  • Effectiveness
    Major (for gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding)
  • Side effects
    None
  • Adherence
    Usually
  • Burden
    Very hard to take
Dosage: 3200 mg Daily
Advice & Tips: For some reason the Oregon Health Plan (new Obama-care insurance) does not cover Asacol HD 800mg TBEC. My recent flare-up may have been exacerbated because I ran out of the medication and couldn't get it refilled. For the last 2 weeks I have been paying out-of-pocket for it and it is EXPENSIVE. I will have to either find another medication option on Monday or work on the appeal process (which looks like a pain in the ass). Until then I will be paying out the whazoo for it because it is the only medication I know of that really can keep me in remission without noticeable side effects.
Cost: $200+ monthly

  • 0 helpful marks

May 19, 2010 (Started May 20, 2006)

  • Effectiveness
    None (for Other)
  • Side effects
    None
  • Adherence
    Always
  • Burden
    Somewhat hard to take
Advice & Tips: Asacol simply doesn't work for me. Never has. It seemed to have no effect at all. That includes side effects.
Cost: < $25 monthly

May 1, 2009 (Started May 20, 2006)

  • Effectiveness
    None (for Other)
  • Side effects
    None
  • Adherence
    Usually
  • Burden
    Very hard to take
Dosage: 4800 mg Daily
Advice & Tips: For some people this may work. Not for me.
Cost: < $25 monthly

  • 0 helpful marks
Last updated:
Showing 2 of 2 patient evaluations for Asacol