What is Ventriculoperitoneal shunt (VP shunt)?

Category: Surgeries

Most popular types: Codman Medos Programmable Shunt

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A ventriculoperitoneal shunt is a tube placed in a ventricle of the brain when an increased amount of cerebrospinal fluid accumulates. The fluid is drained to the abdominal cavity, known as the peritoneum to relieve pressure.

Reported purpose & perceived effectiveness
Purpose Patients Evaluations Perceived Effectiveness
Hydrocephalus 13 6
Idiopathic intracranial hypertension 13 3
Blurry vision 1 0
Chiari malformation 1 0
Hearing loss in left ear 1 0
Hemorrhagic stroke 1 1

Show all 7 reasons taken


  • Major
  • Moderate
  • Slight
  • None
  • Can't tell

Side effects

Side effects as an overall problem

Side effects as an overall problem
Severity Evaluations
Severe 0
Moderate 2
Mild 3
None 4

Commonly reported side effects and conditions associated with Ventriculoperitoneal shunt (VP shunt)

Side effect Patients
Headaches 2
Band of pressure around head 1
Dizziness 1
Nausea 1
Numbness in head 1
Obsessive thinking 1

Show all 8 reported side effects

Dosages

Based on patients currently having Ventriculoperitoneal shunt (VP shunt)

Dosage Patients
as needed 1
one time 1

Duration

Currently having Ventriculoperitoneal shunt (VP shunt)

Duration Patients
2 - 5 years 1
5 - 10 years 1

Stopped having Ventriculoperitoneal shunt (VP shunt)

Duration Patients
Less than 1 month 17
1 - 6 months 1
2 - 5 years 1
5 - 10 years 1
Adherence
Adherence Evaluations
Always 9
Usually 0
Sometimes 0
Never taken as prescribed 0
Burden
Burden Evaluations
Very hard to take 1
Somewhat hard to take 1
A little hard to take 0
Not at all hard to take 7
Cost per month
Cost per month Evaluations
$200+ 0
$100-199 0
$50-99 1
$25-49 0
< $25 4
Not specified 4
Last updated:
There are no evaluations for Ventriculoperitoneal shunt (VP shunt).