What is Quickie?

Category: Equipment

true

Generic name: Wheelchair (manual)

A manual wheelchair typically has handrails on the wheels to allow the user to propel themselves; there may also be handles at the rear to let another person push them.

Reported purpose & perceived effectiveness
Purpose Patients Evaluations Perceived Effectiveness
Fatigue 8 8
Stiffness/spasticity 6 1
Walking problems 6 4
Improve mobility 5 4
General health 2 0

Show all 22 reasons taken


  • Major
  • Moderate
  • Slight
  • None
  • Can't tell

Side effects

Side effects as an overall problem

Side effects as an overall problem
Severity Evaluations Percentage
Severe 2
Moderate 0
Mild 1
None 11

Commonly reported side effects and conditions associated with Quickie

Side effect Patients Percentage
Dislocated shoulder 1
Exhaustion 1
Scraped knuckles 1

Dosages

Based on patients currently using Quickie

Dosage Patients Percentage
daily 2
as needed 1
every 8 weeks 1

Why patients stopped taking Quickie

Multiple reasons could be selected

Reason Patients Percentage
Other 2
Course of treatment ended 1
See all 3 patients who've stopped using Quickie

Duration

Currently using Quickie

Duration Patients Percentage
2 - 5 years 1
10 years or more 3

Stopped using Quickie

Duration Patients Percentage
1 - 6 months 2
1 - 2 years 1
Adherence
Adherence Evaluations Percentage
Always 6
Usually 4
Sometimes 4
Never taken as prescribed 0
Burden
Burden Evaluations Percentage
Very hard to take 2
Somewhat hard to take 1
A little hard to take 7
Not at all hard to take 4
Cost per month
Cost per month Evaluations Percentage
$200+ 3
$100-199 0
$50-99 0
$25-49 2
< $25 4
Not specified 5
Last updated:

2 patient evaluations for Quickie

Oct 27, 2010 (Started Jun 21, 2010)

  • Effectiveness
    Moderate (for fatigue)
  • Effectiveness
    Moderate (for walking problems)
  • Effectiveness
    Major (for mobility limited by distance)
  • Side effects
    Mild (scraped knuckles)
  • Adherence
    Usually
  • Burden
    A little hard to take
Dosage: Daily
Advice & Tips: Standing and/or walking caused me serious fatigue. Using a chair really helps. I stopped using this borrowed chair because I got my permanent chair.
Cost: < $25 monthly
Side effects: scraped knuckles

Jul 16, 2010 (Started Jun 21, 2010)

  • Effectiveness
    Major (for fatigue)
  • Effectiveness
    Major (for walking problems)
  • Side effects
    None
  • Adherence
    Usually
  • Burden
    A little hard to take
Dosage: Daily
Advice & Tips: Technically I am Kurtzke EDSS 5.5, so I am able to walk. But when I do, fatigue consumes my entire body. So I borrowed a K0005 wheelchair (Quickie 2) to try out. It has made a tremendous difference. Because it's helping reduce my secondary fatigue so much, the Veterans Admin has Rxd me a wheelchair. I get fit for it in 3 weeks. This borrowed chair, though helpful, is too wide, too heavy, and too tall for me. I am very excited to be getting my own custom-fit chair. The VA Doc was very glad to hear I was exercising at a gym (including my legs). I continue to walk a little so my legs won't atrophy.
Cost: < $25 monthly
Side effects: scraped knuckles

  • 0 helpful marks

Sep 17, 2009 (Started Jan 05, 1999)

  • Effectiveness
    Moderate (for fatigue)
  • Side effects
    None
  • Adherence
    Usually
  • Burden
    A little hard to take
Dosage: Daily
Cost: < $25 monthly

Jan 5, 2009 (Started Jan 05, 1999)

  • Effectiveness
    Major (for fatigue)
  • Side effects
    None
  • Adherence
    Usually
  • Burden
    Not at all hard to take
Dosage: Daily
Advice & Tips: Many folks seem to think using an electric wheelchair will limit activities. Au' contraire! It improves mobility. A van is not necessary for transport. There are gadgets that go on the rear of the car which hold wheel chairs. City buses must now allow for the transport of wheelchairs, with canvas bags of various bags I can carry quite a lot. They cost between $5500 and $20,000 +, payable by insurance, medicare, medicaid.

  • 0 helpful marks
Last updated:
Showing 2 of 2 patient evaluations for Quickie