What is furosemide?

Furosemide is a loop diuretic (water pill) that prevents your body from absorbing too much salt, allowing the salt to instead be passed in your urine.

Furosemide treats fluid retention (edema) in people with congestive heart failure, liver disease, or a kidney disorder such as nephrotic syndrome. This medication is also used to treat high blood pressure (hypertension).

Furosemide may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Precautions

Do not use this medication if you are unable to urinate.

Before using furosemide, tell your doctor if you have:

  • kidney disease;
  • liver disease;
  • gout;
  • lupus;
  • diabetes; or
  • an allergy to sulfa drugs.

If you have any of these conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely take furosemide.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether this medication is harmful to an unborn baby. Before taking furosemide, tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment.

Furosemide can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Avoid becoming dehydrated. Follow your doctor’s instructions about the type and amount of liquids you should drink while you are taking furosemide.

Avoid exposure to sunlight or artificial UV rays (sunlamps or tanning beds). Furosemide can make your skin more sensitive to sunlight and sunburn may result. Use a sunscreen (minimum SPF 15) and wear protective clothing if you must be out in the sun.

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Instructions

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. Overdose symptoms may include ringing in your ears, loss of appetite, weakness, dizziness, confusion, feeling light-headed, or fainting.

Furosemide is sometimes used only once, so you may not be on a dosing schedule. If you are using the medication regularly, take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and wait until your next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

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Side Effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop using furosemide and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

  • dry mouth, thirst, nausea, vomiting;
  • feeling weak, drowsy, restless, or light-headed;
  • fast or uneven heartbeat;
  • muscle pain or weakness;
  • urinating less than usual or not at all;
  • easy bruising or bleeding, unusual weakness;
  • a red, blistering, peeling skin rash;
  • hearing loss; or
  • nausea, stomach pain, low fever, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes).

Less serious side effects may include:

  • diarrhea, constipation, or stomach pain;
  • headache;
  • numbness, burning, pain, or tingly feeling;
  • dizziness; or
  • blurred vision.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

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Interactions

If you take sucralfate (Carafate), take it at least 2 hours before or after you take furosemide.

Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you are using any of the following drugs:

  • lithium;
  • digoxin (Lanoxin);
  • steroids (prednisone and others);
  • ethacrynic acid (Edecrin);
  • diet pills or cold medicine;
  • other blood pressure medications;
  • amikacin (Amikin), gentamicin (Garamycin), netilmicin (Netromycin), streptomycin, tobramycin (Nebcin, Tobi);
  • salicylates such as aspirin, Disalcid, Doan's Pills, Dolobid, Salflex, Tricosal, and others; or
  • indomethacin.

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with furosemide. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

Other Names

Diaqua-2, Lasix, Lo-Aqua, and furosemide

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Disclaimer

Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Copyright 1996-2004 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version 2.05. Revision date 8/23/04

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