What is Physical Therapy?

Category: Physical Therapy

Most Popular Types: Home Physical Therapy, Outpatient PT, Balance and gait training, (Show all)

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See also: Rehabilitation Physical Therapy

Physical therapy (PT) is a component of rehabilitation to build strength, mobility and fitness. PT may be used short term after an injury or long term following traumatic injury or serious illness such as a stroke to regain as much independence and functioning as possible.

Reported purpose & perceived effectiveness
Purpose Patients Patients with evaluations Perceived Effectiveness
Osteoarthritis 314 63
Stiffness/Spasticity 269 76
Degenerative Disc Disease 267 51
Fibromyalgia 137 56
Balance problems 117 48
Improve flexibility/strength 79 20

  • Major
  • Moderate
  • Slight
  • None
  • Can't tell

Side effects

Side effects as an overall problem

side_effects of Physical Therapy"

Severe
40
Moderate
73
Mild
112
None
324

Commonly reported side effects, conditions, and hospitalizations associated with Physical Therapy

Pain 65
Fatigue 29
Muscle aches 20
Hospitalization 18
Muscle soreness 13
Pain in lower back 11

Show all 93 reported side effects

Dosages

Most common dosages (by patients currently going to Physical Therapy)
Dosage Patients
60 min weekly 131
weekly 127
120 min weekly 123
180 min weekly 79
90 min weekly 75
as needed 58
daily 53
30 min weekly 42
45 min weekly 25
30 min daily 25
Why Patients Stopped Going to Physical Therapy (multiple reasons could be selected)
Reason Patients
Course of treatment ended 500
Did not seem to work 235
Expense 187
Other 182
Side effects too severe 118
Doctor's advice 85
Change in health plan coverage 65
Not indicated 12
Personal research 9
See all 1029 patients who’ve stopped going to Physical Therapy

Duration

Currently Going to Physical Therapy
Duration Patients
0-1 month 2
1-3 months 3
3-6 months 19
6 months-1 year 28
1-2 years 42
2 years or more 159
Stopped Going to Physical Therapy
Duration Patients
0-1 month 118
1-3 months 325
3-6 months 202
6 months-1 year 120
1-2 years 78
2 years or more 105
Adherence
Always
276 50%
Usually
188 34%
Sometimes
64 12%
Never
21 4%
Burden
Very
80 15%
Somewhat
199 36%
A little
155 28%
Not at all
115 21%
Cost per month
$200+
84 23%
$100-199
70 19%
$50-99
39 11%
$25-49
26 7%
< $25
146 40%
Last updated:

90 patient evaluations for Physical Therapy

lcs
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lcs
Sex: F
Data Quality: 2 stars
On
Mouth/throat: mild
Arms: mild
Chest: mild
Legs: mild
I am: g
I have:
Parkinson's

See lcs's full Physical Therapy history

Jan 15, 2015 (Started Jun 15, 2014)

  • Perceived effectiveness for Stiffness/Spasticity: Major
  • Side Effects: None
  • Adherence: Usually
  • Burden: Somewhat
Dosage: 45 min Weekly

  • 0 helpful marks
Tulabee
14440 thumb
Tulabee
Sex: F
Data Quality: 3 stars
On
Mouth/throat: mild
Arms: mild
Chest: mild
Legs: mild
I am: g
I have:
Parkinson's

See Tulabee's full Physical Therapy history

Nov 9, 2014 (Started Oct 06, 2009)

  • Perceived effectiveness for Parkinson's Disease: Moderate
  • Side Effects: None
  • Adherence: Sometimes
  • Burden: Somewhat
Advice & Tips: July 2014. Visit to orthopedist and PT for shoulder impingement.
Cost: $25-49 monthly

Nov 9, 2009 (Started Oct 06, 2009)

  • Perceived effectiveness for Parkinson's Disease: Moderate
  • Side Effects: None
  • Adherence: Usually
  • Burden: Not at all
Dosage: 90 min Monthly
Advice & Tips: My fitsy 3 visits gave me enough exercises for several months. I don't know how often i should see the PT.
Cost: $25-49 monthly

  • 0 helpful marks
StrkL
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StrkL
Sex: M
Data Quality: 3 stars
Off
Mouth/throat: mild
Arms: none
Chest: none
Legs: moderate
I am: g
I have:
Parkinson's

See StrkL's full Physical Therapy history

Jun 25, 2014 (Started Jun 01, 2009)

  • Perceived effectiveness for Balance problems: Major
  • Perceived effectiveness for Parkinson's Disease: Moderate
  • Perceived effectiveness for Dystonia: Major
  • Perceived effectiveness for Freezing of gait: Moderate
  • Perceived effectiveness for Improve mobility: Major
  • Side Effects: None
  • Adherence: Usually
  • Burden: Not at all
Dosage: 30 min Weekly
Advice & Tips: I am putting this in a separate category from my regular workout routine. I do this to reduce dystonia and to reduce freezing. My Home Physical Therapy consists of 5 things: 1. Balance exercises; 2. Walking with weights; 3. Walking on my heels; 4. Walking on my toes; 5. Walking backwards and sideways. Here were the descriptions of what I do: 1. Balance exercises A. Every other day, I swing a 10-lb dumbbell around my waist while standing on one leg -(2 sets of 60 sec each on left leg, one set of 60 sec on right leg). The other day I do the exercises on a wobble board. Most day I also attempt to stand on each leg for 60 sec with my eyes closed (I stand in a corner and put my hands out for balance.B. Spins I spin clockwise once, then counter-clockwise once; then I spin CW twice and CCW twice; then CW three times and CCW three times; then CW five times and CCW five times. I do A before the rest of my workout; I do B before and after. 2. Walking with weights A. I walk with 20-lb dumbbells for about 5 minutes before the rest of my workout. Most days I also walk with 10-lb dumbbells for 5 minutes before the rest of my workout. 3. Walking on my heels. I walk on my heels for five minutes after my workout. 4. Walking on my toes I walk on my toes for about five minutes every other day after the rest of my workout. 5. Walking backwards and sideways. Most weeks I will, a couple of times a week, walk backwards for twp or three minutes, walk sideways to the left for two minutes, and walk sideways to the right for two minutes. I do this after the rest of my workout.
Cost: < $25 monthly

Feb 10, 2014 (Started Jun 01, 2009)

  • Perceived effectiveness for Balance problems: Major
  • Perceived effectiveness for Parkinson's Disease: Moderate
  • Perceived effectiveness for Dystonia: Major
  • Perceived effectiveness for Freezing of gait: Moderate
  • Side Effects: None
  • Adherence: Always
  • Burden: Not at all
Dosage: 30 min Monthly
Advice & Tips: I am putting this in a separate category from my regular workout routine. I do this to reduce dystonia and to reduce freezing. My Home Physical Therapy consists of 4 things: 1. Balance exercises; 2. Walking with weights; 3. Walking on my heels; 4. Walking on my toes: Here are the descriptions of what I do: 1. Balance exercises A. I swing a 10-lb dumbbell around my waist while standing on one leg -(2 sets of 30 sec each on right leg, 2 sets of 60 sec each on left leg). B. Standing on wobble board (2 sets of 30 sec each on right leg, 2 sets of 60 sec each on left leg). C. Spins I spin clockwise once, then counter-clockwise once; then I spin CW twice and CCW twice; then CW three times and CCW three times; then CW five times and CCW five times. I do A and B before the rest of my workout; I do C before and after. 2. Walking with weights A. I walk with 15-lb dumbbells for 2-3 minutes B. I walk backward with 5-lb dumbbells for 2-3 minutes I do A and B before the rest of my workout. 3. Walking on my heels A. I walk on my heels for one minute before the rest of my workout B. I walk on my heels for five minutes after I'm done 4. Walking on my toes I walk on my toes for about a minute before the rest of my workout
Cost: < $25 monthly

Sep 25, 2012 (Started Jun 01, 2009)

  • Perceived effectiveness for Parkinson's Disease: Moderate
  • Perceived effectiveness for Dystonia: Moderate
  • Side Effects: Mild
  • Adherence: Always
  • Burden: A little
Dosage: 30 min Monthly
Advice & Tips: I follow a specific program to reduce my dystonia. See http://home.earthlink.net/~strkl/ for it.
Cost: < $25 monthly

Dec 1, 2011 (Started Jun 01, 2009)

  • Perceived effectiveness for Dystonia: Moderate
  • Side Effects: Moderate
  • Adherence: Usually
  • Burden: Somewhat
Dosage: 30 min Monthly
Advice & Tips: My dystonia is worse in my left foot. It becomes pigeon-toed (pointing inward), and tends to twist so that I land on the outside of my foot when walking. In fact, I need to be careful that my ankle doesn't roll over (twisting my ankle). If I concentrate on landing more to the inside of my foot, and trying to keep my foot straight, I can continue to walk for a while. I've worked up to the point where I can walk for a mile or more this way. And I've found that I seem to have built up resistance to dystonia. I can exercise at higher intensity, or for a longer time, before getting dystonia. It used to be that once I went into dystonia, I would have to stop walking or running and finish my workout on an exercise bike or elliptical machine. And I would not be able to walk normally until I took my next dose and waited 30 to 60 minutes for it to take effect. (And it would be preferable to take my next dose immediately, or it would take two hours for me to come on then.) But now, even after pushing through the dystonia, once I shower and change, my dystonia is gone, and I can take my medication on my usual schedule. I do this as part of my regular exercise routine, not as Home Physical Therapy. I've just entered it this way because it seems to be the only way I can do so. I wrote about this in more detail at http://www.patientslikeme.com/forum/pd/topics/100055?post_id=1535080#post-1535080
Cost: < $25 monthly

  • 0 helpful marks
Last updated:
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